Cultural Commentary

Michael Tilson Thomas, now in the final season of his 25 years at the helm of the San Francisco Symphony, has left a profound imprint on both the orchestra and the city.

Small and midsize art galleries increasingly find themselves subject to the law of unintended consequences.

Eighty years ago, Duke Ellington and his band reached a new peak of musical expression on their ‘Blanton-Webster’ recordings thanks to an unparalleled roster.

A draft executive order mandating classical architecture as the official government style would result in watered-down design.

The reggae legend would have turned 75 this week; his music still resonates thanks to its multilayered meanings.

A view from the anniversary commemoration at the camp and the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum, where historical fissures still linger.

The year 2020 marks the 250th birthday of the great composer, and he remains as influential yet elusive as ever.

Marcel Camus’s film ‘Black Orpheus,’ released in the U.S. 60 years ago this month, spawned a still-popular soundtrack full of bossa nova that helped spark the 1960s craze for the music.

From rarely presented works to glaring holes in the music catalog, a list of recordings and performances our classical-music critic hopes to see in the years ahead.

Spending $120,000 on a piece of fruit is absurd—but that’s exactly the point of Maurizio Cattelan’s controversial artwork.

Robert Evans—who died Saturday and produced ‘Chinatown,’ ‘The Godfather’ and more—was a film titan with distinctive taste and a preference for art over profits.

Thanks to 3-D scans of Notre Dame made before and after this year’s catastrophic fire, we have an incredible wealth of information to aid in the restoration of an architectural icon.

The university’s new Charles Library, designed by Snøhetta, is a joyously extroverted building that embraces its neighborhood, exploits the social energy of the community and celebrates the quest for knowledge.

Despite being one of the most prolific and famous living composers, Philip Glass’s work is rarely performed by major American orchestras.

The lyrical jazz pianist, born 90 years ago this month, blurred the line between front man and accompanist in his intimate connections with other musicians.

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